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Published November 25, 2014

The title of WolfCop should be pretty self explanatory. Lou (Leo Fafard) is an alcoholic cop. He’s also a werewolf. He fights crime. It’s a quirky premise aided by a 79 minute run time. Unfortunately, the crime Lou is trying to solve is his own back story.

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The opening titles suggest that the how of Lou’s werewolfdom won’t be all that central, but as the film establishes its characters it’s clear that won’t be the case. The narrative focuses on Lou, a drunk cop who’s terrible at his job. The characters are trope laden parodies, and the writing successfully uses this to create a campy, fun atmosphere. It quickly becomes clear that all is not as it seems in this snowy Canadian hamlet.

The plot is silly but logical and the film ticks along at a tidy pace so that its missteps are quickly forgotten. By the halfway point, it’s finally the film everyone wants it to be – Lou, in wolf form, solving crimes – but it doesn’t stay that way for long. There’s a funny but drawn out sex scene. The acting is varied, with Amy Matysio and Sarah Lind both providing stitled performances, but it’s an each way bet as to whether that’s intentional. WolfCop riffs on 1980s horror genre convention, with a rock soundtrack and a lot of ADR.

The production of WolfCop is colourful and organized. Written and directed by Lowell Dean, the dialogue is basic but appropriate, and the werewolf puns hilarious. The visual effects are very well done, skipping back and forth over the line thin line between gross and ridiculous.

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It’s difficult to say much more about WolfCop. Aside from a distinct lack of Wolf-copping, it’s everything you would expect it to be.

WolfCop is available on Blu-Ray and DVD.

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