Review: George Dimarelos’ Self Sabotage is “delightfully insightful and funny”

Everybody has that moment when they look back on life and decide they’ve completely messed everything up. George Dimarelos’ stand up show Self Sabotage is a delightfully insightful and funny take on how the decisions we make can affect our lives.

Self Sabotage starts out slow; Dimarelos flirts with his audience, he allows them to get to know him and his style of comedy. He draws the audience into the performance, but doesn’t take compliments well. By pinpointing people in the crowd and riffing off their compliments he draws them into a conversation about the ideals of masculinity and why men don’t think they can stare at themselves in public bathroom mirrors. It makes you think about where this behaviour came from before he takes everything in a completely different direction, leaving you confused and amused.

As a performer, Dimarelos is very Australian. He’s charming and quick-witted as well as being a lad who jokes about girls and feelings through a distinctly male lens. This masculinity isn’t unwelcome though; he manages to tie in how to ask a girl out and the whole club experience though a fresh and amusing perspective. He’s confident, he’s funny (and he knows it), and as a second-generation immigrant that, assumedly, has never worked in a café, Dimarelos has some strong ideas about how brunch should be handled.

Throughout the performance he pitters off into tangents; throws out zingers in the form of one-liners and offhand comments that seem as if they’ve just been made up on the spot. It feels like you’re at the pub with a friend and he’s telling you the story of his latest wacky adventure, the audience is suddenly full of his mates and everyone is in on the joke.

George Dimarelos may have a stage made of milk crates but for an hour this stand-up comedian manages to make you forget the little details. Self Sabotage is a fantastic fun-filled hour of nothing but good times.

 

George Dimarelos’ Self Sabotage is playing until 23 April – tickets start at $12.30. For more information and to buy tickets, visit the MICF website.

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