Review: Undercover Festival Cops – Chris Martin and Taylor Edwards

Raw and ready, Undercover Festival Cops by Chris Martin and Taylor Edwards makes for a very enjoyable night out. A sketch show with a healthy degree of audience interaction, and some absurd, deliberately bad props and costumes, Undercover Festival Cops highlights Martin and Edwards’ abilities to adapt to situations and entertain audiences with their witty one liners, absurd stage antics, and ability to insert meta humour without being pretentious.

Maybe it’s a Brisbane thing?

As with any good comedy sketch show, the plot hinges on ridiculous antics and assumptions. As all the characters are portrayed by the two actors (and some voice-overs), the changes in characters are all the more absurd and add to the ridiculous nature of the show. That being said, it is a testimony to Martin and Edwards that they managed to be both overblown in their antics, yet could also show changes in characters effectively.

What made the show however was the audience participation. No heckling, playing along with the antics, and engaging when engagement was necessary, the audience really shared the experiences with the performers. Audience participation is always risky, especially when they do things out of script (as invariably happens), but fortunately Martin and Edwards were quick thinkers and could adapt quickly.

That being said, it did drag out a little too long. Some of the humour in the middle was a little bit weak, although everything came together in the end. It could have been a little shorter than it ended up being, but it wasn’t tiresome or overly drawn out.

There does need to be some niche knowledge of Australian humour and history, with some of the jokes falling a little flat. But in spite of the minor problems, if you are after a night of absurdities and humour, definitely check Undercover Festival Cops out. Laughs and a good mood are definitely to be had here.

 

Chris Martin and Taylor Edwards’ show Undercover Cops is only on until 23 April. Tickets are available on the MICF website or at the door.

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Aidan Johnson

Born in 1992, in Sydney, raised in Newcastle, and educated in Canberra. Musician - percussion and drums are my forte. I am a historian, a reviewer and a generally relaxed person to be around.

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