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Published February 26, 2020

Leni, 5, is refusing to put on her school uniform, instead she wants to wear her super hero costume – how else will her new school friends know she’s a demi-goddess. She is Eurydice after all. Eurydice is the traditional Orpheus and the underworld myth but from her perspective.

Performed within a rose garden tucked away in the Adelaide Botanic Garden, Eurydice is the sister show of Orpheus, or should that be wife? This slightly less raw and gritty (and by a fraction of percent) than Orpheus but keeps the heart.

A twist on the ancient story, most of this work is focused on Eurydice as a younger women living in a distant suburb of London, and her passionate and possibly foolish marriage to Aristaeus, or Ari, God of Bees, and only about 30% of its stage time spent on her time with Orpheus, and in the underworld.

Leni and Ari’s story, is a welcome addition to the myth, giving both purpose and perspective to her story. Without spoiling to much, life almost imitated art when Yoshika Issabella Colwell, who plays Eurydice, was hospitalized early in the run after bee-string, and even in this performance was almost stung again, yet she recovered impressively.

The work features words once again by Alexander Wright, and music by Phil Grainger, but this time the work is told for them most part by Colwell, a breathtaking performer who embodies the role of this goddess, or demi-demi-godess, as 5 year old Leni reminds us. Traditionally (and last time this reviewer saw the work) Ari, Orpheus, and a large part of the music, is played by another female, but in this performance Grainger takes one the parts, and he is entirely at home in the roles.

Meddling spoken word, poetry, acoustic music and a dash of electronica this 75 minute work is both a stunning addition to the creators arsenal of works, and a stand out stand alone work in this year fringe.

Like with is partner/sibling shows – make time to see it.

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