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Published July 22, 2013

Well I’ve been coveting this book since I realised it existed.

Spider-Men, pretty obviously, is a comic book about more than one Spider-Man. Peter Parker is the first to be introduced in this book, along with his usual snark and some self-aware monologuing. Boom, bang, some criminals taken care of and some police evaded. It’s all in a night’s work for Peter, but his attention is piqued by some distant, mysterious lights. You don’t get mysterious lights without aliens, villains or both, so of course, Spider-Man runs into Mysterio, a long-time enemy. All is going well, until our beloved Spidey goes through a dimensional rift to another world.

Oooh.

Peter Parker doesn’t know it yet, but it’s the Ultimates world. Peter Parker died as a teenager here, and a kid called Miles Morales is now Spider-Man. Sidebar: when the fact that the Ultimate Spider-Man would be mixed-race first came out, the internet was divided. Some were adamantly against the idea that Spider-Man could be not white. (Some being jackasses.) Miles is great as Spider-Man. He’s only thirteen, which is pretty young for a superhero. But he’s interesting – clever, witty and really fun to read.

Via: comicvine.com
Via: comicvine.com

Having two Spider-Men around at the same time is awesome. Miles, after battling his hero, spends some quality time with him.  Considering Peter’s technically dead, that’s a pretty sweet deal for Miles. On Peter’s end, he gets to visit his family and friends in a world where he died quite young – emotionally confronting for all involved. Aunt May and Gwen Stacy get a kind of closure, while Mary Jane…well not so much.

This limited series ran for five issues. I got it in a trade paperback, and it’s well worth it. The art is clean but detailed, the writing is fun and all that emotional what-not is handled well.

10/10, would recommend.

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