Skip to content
Published March 27, 2016

Demi Lardner is okay with the fact that she looks like a young boy. She’s an option for homosexuality for either gender and that’s something that she’s fine with. Life Mechanic is a hectic 55 minutes that consist of Lardner’s nonstop energetic tirade about everything from beer and her father’s somewhat skewed life talks.

The best way to describe Lardner is as a tiny person filled with the energy of two more people. From the beginning of the show she is loud and enthusiastic, introducing herself from off stage as she runs in, jumping down to frantically enthusiastically high five the first three rows only five minutes in in response to almost frat-like boner joke.

Lardner is an expressive performer, she is constantly throwing herself about the tiny stage jumping and dancing to accompany the increased volume she takes during certain bits. The title of the show Life Mechanic is accurate in regards to the material we’re treated to for the evening. The night consists of varying life advice that you probably shouldn’t take overly seriously, such as making friends – just grab them and don’t let them leave. She isn’t scared of making fun of herself and the humour and confusion that comes with her young appearance, none of this self-mockery is self-deprecating. Everything is said with pride and acceptance an attitude that, by the end of the show leaves us liking Lardner more and more.


187_cropped_730x4122.1449812522

The layout of the show seems to be somewhat random and unplanned; with Lardner jumping from topic to topic with a few rocky segues. It feels rough and unpractised though this may be the charm behind Lardner and her appeal. Tight production and rapid-fire delivery this isn’t, it’s closer to rapid ramblings. The highlight for me was the “random” call from her father in the middle of the show and his continued comments are just so parent-like. It felt more structured and organised and drew more laughs from the crowd as opposed to other moments where jokes fell a little flat.

Lardner’s main appeal though is her unbridled enthusiasm and energy, it’s almost infectious throughout the night and I doubt any member of the audience left without a large smile upon their face. Life Mechanic is a messy. fun night out.

Life Mechanic is at Vic Hote  (Vic’s Bar) Tue – Sun and Melb Town Hall on Mondays from 24th March – 17th April as part of the Melbourne International Comedy Festival. Tickets can be purchased here.

One Comment

  1. […] quickest wits: renowned Melbournian David Quirk, the irrepressible energy and abstractions of Demi Lardner, who was a nominee for this year’s Barry at MICF and a joint winner of the Best Newcomer […]

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *